“You’re not losing your mind. You’re grieving”

Grief, especially in the early days after the death of a loved one can feel very confusing. The one question I hear over and over again is: “Am I losing my mind”? No, you’re not. Often well meaning friends or family will try to get you to lighten up, get busy or get over it, because they think there is a limited amount of time for a person to go through normal grief. What if I told you that there is no such thing as normal grief? Just like we all have completely unique thumb prints, so do we each have unique ways of grieving. And grief can be cumulative. When we move on too quickly from our grief, we can end up carrying that grief with us for a lifetime. It’s like a backpack that keeps getting heavier and heavier. And you wonder why we feel so tired! Human’s grieve the losses that come from change; even positive change. We just aren’t taught to recognize and grieve our losses, until they manifests in anxiety, depression, overeating or relationship struggles. Grief doesn’t just pertain to death. Divorce, illness, aging, career losses, becoming an “empty-nester” and break-ups, are all examples of losses that deserve to be grieved. Our society isn’t very good with grief. We don’t have a language for discussing it. And we often lack the patience to listen.

As a Grief Specialist, I’ve led grief groups for the Betty Ford Center and I’ve developed grief and loss groups for AIDS Project Los Angeles and Gosold on Cape Cod.

As a Grief Therapist, I promise to…

• Listen without judgment

• Provide evidence-based tools for managing difficult emotions

• Provide discussion of spirituality if asked.

• Evaluate every client for symptoms of complicated grief and provide appropriate treatment.

Sharing your grief with a professional can help you get to a “new normal”.
Let’s get you feeling better.

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